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Buckle Up and Don’t Forget to Pack Your AD&D Insurance Thumbnail

Buckle Up and Don’t Forget to Pack Your AD&D Insurance

The United States’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ranks deaths resulting from accidents as the fourth leading cause of death for US citizens. Accidents include everything from car accidents, to falls and drowning. But US citizens traveling or living abroad also experience devastating accidents—those that kill or maim—at rates that shouldn’t be ignored.

The US Department of State shows that, sadly, between June 2003 to June 2016, there were at least 10,883 reported deaths of US citizens due to non-natural causes overseas. Of those fatalities, 29.5% were the result of vehicular accidents; 22.3% from homicides and terrorist actions; 15.7% from other accidents including train and aircraft accidents, natural disasters as well as falls, mountain climbing accidents and rafting; and 14% from drowning and maritime accidents. Read More »

US State Department Travel Warning for Honduras Thumbnail

US State Department Travel Warning for Honduras

Traveling around the world has risk.  Limit your financial risk of unforeseen illness and accidents with a high quality travel insurance policy.

The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning for Honduras to inform U.S. citizens about the security situation in Honduras.

Tens of thousands of U.S. citizens safely visit Honduras each year for study, tourism, business, and volunteer work. However, crime and violence are serious problems throughout the country. Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. San Pedro Sula is considered to be the world’s most violent city, with 159 murders for every 100,000 residents in 2011. These threats have increased substantially over the past several years, and incidents can occur anywhere. In January 2012, the Peace Corps withdrew its volunteers from the country to conduct an administrative review of the security situation.  Read More »